Easter, Eostre, Resurrection Sunday

Easter postcard circa early 20th century

Easter postcard circa early 20th century (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It troubles me that every year Christians celebrate Easter.  Of course, I believe in celebrating the Resurrection of Jesus Christ, but the name “Easter” should give us a clue that something is terribly wrong.  For example, if you look up “Easter” in the Oxford Encyclopedic Dictionary, you will find that Easter is named after “Eostre,” the goddess of spring.  Why name the most important day on the Christian calendar after a pagan goddess?  Eostre’s feast day is the first Sunday after the full moon after the spring equinox, but Christ’s Resurrection occurred after Passover.  Easter sometimes (but not always) occurs before Passover.  Christ rose from the dead on First Fruits (see Leviticus 23) following Passover.

What about Easter egg hunts?  Sure, they’re fun; but what does that have to do with Christ’s Resurrection?  Absolutely nothing, but it has everything to do with the fertility goddess.  That’s why you see images of rabbits next to Isis.  Eostre, Ishtar, Isis, Astarte, and  Ashtoreth are the same fertility goddess dressed up in different disguises.

Can we honor God by Christianizing pagan holidays?  Obviously not.  God’s Word tells us that we are not to worship our God as the pagans worship their gods.

I am pleased that many churches have opted to use the term “Resurrection Day” instead of Easter.  That a start in the right direction.  God’s feasts are known as “God’s Appointed Times.”  Clearly “Easter” is not one of them.  First Fruits (Resurrection Day) is.

I know that Christians attending Easter services are thinking about Christ Resurrection, not Eostre.  Nevertheless, God wants us to know the truth.  Wiccan’s know.  It’s time the Body of Christ knew too.

In 325 A.D. at Nicea, Constantine changed the date of the Resurrection from First Fruits to Easter.  He changed the Sabbath from Saturday to Sunday.  Before his alleged conversion to Christianity, he worshipped the sun-god.  Constantine is a controversial figure.  Did he ever become a Christian?  Or did he use Christianity for political purposes?  Was he anti-semitic?

To obey God, we cannot mix the sacred with the profane.

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9 comments

  1. What you have shared is very true! Easter has nothing to do with the appointed times of YHVH or with Scripture. Its interesting that Eostre is also known as ashtoreth which in turn is just another name for Semiramis, the wife(mother?) of Nimrod. She is the queen of heaven in Jeremiah 7:18 and 44:17. I just couldnt understand where the easter bunny and the easter eggs fitted into the resurrection of Messiah, just never made sense to me. Now we know that easter is a pagan feast (which involves sacrificing infants too) which the follower of Messiah must avoid at all cost. Its just sad that most people (especially churchmen) wont even hear you out and dismiss it as ‘jewish stuff’.

    Great Post
    Blessings and Shalom to you

    1. Thanks for your encouraging reply. This is something that has been on my heart for quite a while, but I’ve been hesitant to share it. Telling the truth about long-held “pagan” traditions doesn’t sit well with family, friends, and the average church-goer. The more I read about “the high places, the asteroth, and the baals” that God consistently condemns in the Bible, I wonder why it is taking the church so long to catch on.

      In all fairness, I should add that for years I wondered why Easter and Passover usually did not coincide; but I didn’t think to look into it. Like most Protestants and Catholics, I kept rationalizing, trying to find a Christian explanation for Easter eggs, etc. Then I heard.Norm Franz of Ascensions Ministries talking about “The Mystery of Christmas” and “Jezebel in the Marketplace.” Like you, he begins with Semiramis and Nimrod and brings it forward to modern times. I began doing my own research and came up with the same conclusions he did.

      Once you know the truth, you don’t have the option of keeping silent. Our mission is not to please man but to please God. Blessings to you and yours at this Passover season.

    2. Thanks! Blessings and Shalom to you also!

  2. Please remove my link from your site immediately.

  3. Traditions can be so deeply engrained, handed down from one geration to the next, and much like old habits sometimes die hard. Thanks for the article, you have some good reads here(“-“)

    1. Thank you! Yes, old habits and traditions die hard. The hardest part for me was giving up chocolate covered marshmallow eggs. Then I reminded myself that they are loaded with calories–something I sure don’t need.

  4. Asking questions are actually good thing if you are not understanding something totally, but this
    paragraph offers good understanding yet.

  5. Yes, it’s always a good idea to ask questions about traditions and their origins. Thank you.

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